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What to expect for Thanksgiving time and how it compares to years past – NBC Chicago

Chicago Thanksgiving promises to be warm.

Having already tasted winter in November, Chicago-area residents will likely get a reprieve this Thanksgiving, with temperatures expected to be above average.

While average temperatures for Thanksgiving are in the mid-40s, temperatures are expected to climb into the low 50s in the afternoon, with temperatures in the low 40s expected in the morning.

The sky will likely be partly cloudy in the morning before cloud cover becomes more significant in the afternoon, according to the NBC 5 Storm team.

Rain showers can develop in the late afternoon into the evening hours, with more regular rain more likely south of the Chicago area and in the southern suburbs. Suburbs north of Chicago are expected to receive little to no rain.

Thursday’s expected high of 52 degrees and low of 38 degrees move away from historic Thanksgiving extremes for Chicago, with the city’s record for hottest and coldest temperatures currently at 69 degrees and 14 degrees, respectively.

Below is a rundown of the 10 hottest and coldest Thanksgivings in Chicago history, according to the National Weather Service:

10 Heartiest Thanksgivings

  • 60 degrees (1879, 1976, 2015)
  • 61 Degrees (1973, 1998)
  • 62 Degrees (1981)
  • 63 degrees (1896, 1915, 2012)
  • 64 degrees (1914)
  • 69 Degrees (1966)

10 Coldest Thanksgivings

  • 25 Degrees (1903, 1956)
  • 24 degrees (1889, 1898, 1929)
  • 22 degrees (1945)
  • 19 degrees (1872, 1877, 1881)
  • 14 degrees (1930)

Although no snow is forecast for Thanksgiving this year, snowfall has been recorded on 23% of Thanksgivings in Chicago since data was first collected in 1871, with 5% of Thanksgivings receiving an inch or more of snowfall. .

Here’s a look at some of the snowiest Thanksgivings in Chicago’s history:

10 Snowiest Thanksgivings

  • 0.5 inches (1902, 1945)
  • 0.6 inches (1903)
  • 0.9 inches (1944)
  • 1.1 inches (1975)
  • 1.2 inches (1947)
  • 1.5 inches (1953)
  • 1.8 inches (1950)
  • 2.1 inches (1893)
  • 2.5 inch (1949)
  • 3 inch (1980)

NBC Chicago

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