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US Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry licenses


The Supreme Court struck down a New York law that severely restricted concealed-carry licenses, in the High Court’s biggest Second Amendment decision in a decade.

President Joe Biden said he was “deeply disappointed” with the decision, saying in a statement that it “contradicts both common sense and the Constitution, and should trouble us all deeply.”

Thursday’s 6-3 decision overturned a lower court’s opinion, which had upheld New York’s 108-year-old law limiting licenses to carry weapons concealed in public to those who demonstrate “good cause”.

Judge Clarence Thomas expressed the majority opinion, writing that New York law prevents law-abiding citizens from exercising their Second Amendment rights.

New York isn’t alone in severely limiting who can get a concealed carry license in public, and the new ruling will likely make it easier to carry a gun legally in major cities like Los Angeles, Boston and Baltimore.

The court’s decision comes as the Senate prepared to vote on Thursday to advance a bipartisan gun control bill, in what could be the first new federal gun legislation in decades.

The Supreme Court struck down a New York law that required applicants for a concealed carry license to show a ‘legitimate cause’ for their application

US Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry licenses

Thursday’s 6-3 decision followed ideological lines, with the court’s conservative majority all voting in favor of overturning the New York law.

New York Governor Kathy Hochul, a Democrat, reacted angrily to the court’s ruling, saying it went against efforts to restrict gun rights following several mass shootings very publicized.

“It is outrageous that at a time of national awareness of gun violence, the Supreme Court has recklessly struck down a New York law that limits who can carry concealed weapons,” Hochul wrote in a tweet.

“In response to this decision, we are carefully considering our options – including calling a special session of the legislature,” the governor added.

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg also criticized the decision, saying in a statement, “This decision is a serious threat to public safety not only in New York City, but across the country.”

Bragg said his office is analyzing the decision and will work to develop new legislation within the confines of the court’s decision.

“The Supreme Court may have made our job more difficult, but we will only redouble our efforts to develop new solutions to end the epidemic of gun violence and ensure lasting public safety,” he said. he declares.

New York Mayor Eric Adams – who himself has a concealed carry permit – said the decision would “put New Yorkers at additional risk of gun violence”.

“We have prepared for this decision and will continue to do everything we can to work with our federal, state and local partners to protect our city,” Adams wrote in a tweet.

Biden, in a lengthy statement, also expressed dismay at the decision, saying “lives are at stake.”

“In the wake of the horrific attacks in Buffalo and Uvalde, as well as the daily acts of gun violence that don’t make national headlines, we must do more as a society – not less – to protect our fellow Americans,” said Biden said.

US Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry licenses

New York Governor Kathy Hochul, a Democrat, reacted angrily to the court’s decision and said she would consider calling a special session of the legislature to respond.

US Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry licenses

US Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry licenses

In contrast, gun rights advocates reacted enthusiastically to the ruling, saying it bolsters the constitutional right to bear arms.

“Today’s decision is a decisive victory for good men and women across America and is the result of a decades-long fight by the NRA,” said Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association.

“The right to self-defense and defense of your family and loved ones should not stop at your home,” he added.

The court ruling will have sweeping implications in major cities including Los Angeles, Boston and Baltimore

The new ruling will have far-reaching implications in a number of states with similar laws.

California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Rhode Island all have similar laws.

Thursday’s court ruling should ultimately allow more people to legally carry guns on the streets of the nation’s largest cities — including Baltimore, Los Angeles and Boston — and elsewhere.

About a quarter of the US population lives in states expected to be affected by the ruling, the High Court’s first major gun ruling in more than a decade.

The decision comes as Congress is actively working on gun legislation following recent mass shootings in Texas, New York and California.

The new ruling will have far-reaching implications in a number of states with similar laws.

California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Rhode Island all have similar laws. The Biden administration had urged judges to uphold New York law.

Thursday’s court ruling should ultimately allow more people to legally carry guns on the streets of the nation’s largest cities — including New York, Los Angeles and Boston — and elsewhere.

About a quarter of the US population lives in states expected to be affected by the ruling, the High Court’s first major gun ruling in more than a decade.

The decision comes as Congress is actively working on gun legislation following recent mass shootings in Texas, New York and California.

Justice Thomas wrote for the majority that the Constitution protects “an individual’s right to carry a handgun in self-defence outside his home.”

In their decision, the judges struck down a New York law requiring people to demonstrate a special need to carry a firearm in order to obtain a license to carry one in public.

The justices said the requirement violates the Second Amendment right to “keep and bear arms.”

In a dissent joined by fellow Liberals, Justice Stephen Breyer focused on the toll of gun violence. “Since the start of this year alone (2022), 277 mass shootings have already been reported, an average of more than one per day,” Breyer wrote.

Proponents of the New York law had argued that overturning it would ultimately lead to more guns on the streets and higher rates of violent crime.

The decision comes at a time when gun violence already on the rise during the coronavirus pandemic has escalated again.

In most of the country, gun owners have little difficulty legally carrying their guns in public.

But that had been harder to do in New York and the handful of states with similar laws.

New York law, in effect since 1913, states that to carry a concealed handgun in public, a person applying for a license must show a “good cause,” a specific need to carry the weapon.

The state issues unlimited licenses where a person can carry their gun anywhere and restricted licenses which allow a person to carry the gun but only for specific purposes such as hunting and target shooting or worms. and from his place of business.

US Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry licenses

New York Mayor Eric Adams – who himself has a concealed carry permit – said the decision would ‘put New Yorkers at additional risk of gun violence’

US Supreme Court strikes down New York law restricting concealed carry licenses

Indeed, the rules have made it nearly impossible to obtain a concealed carry license in New York City, where permits are primarily issued to retired cops, business owners who handle large sums of money, and celebrities who face death threats.

The list of concealed carry permit holders in New York City is not public, but a 2011 New York Times analysis found that approximately 4,000 people in the city had permits.

Donald Trump revealed in 2012 that he was one of the city’s permit holders, claiming he owned two semi-automatic pistols.

Mayor Eric Adams, who calls himself both a former police officer and a public figure, also revealed on the campaign trail that he plans to carry a concealed weapon after taking office.

The Supreme Court last handed down a major gun ruling in 2010. In that ruling and a 2008 ruling, the justices established a national right to keep a gun in the home for self-defense.

The question for the court this time was about carrying one out of the house.

Story in development, more to follow.

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