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Trump was convicted on 34 counts and faces 54 other criminal charges.

A New York jury found Donald Trump guilty Thursday of 34 counts of falsifying business records to conceal money paid to adult film actress Stormy Daniels in 2016 to prevent her from speaking publicly of a sexual encounter she claims to have had years earlier.

But this conviction is only one of the legal obstacles facing the former president. There are also 54 criminal charges spread across three other cases. Two cases are linked to Trump’s alleged efforts to overturn the 2020 election, which he lost; and the third concerns the classified documents that Trump allegedly took with him after leaving the White House. Trump has denied any wrongdoing in each case, and it is unclear when those trials will be scheduled.


Classified

document case

Georgia 2020

election case

Classified

document case

Georgia 2020

election case

Georgia 2020

election case

Classified

document case

The most significant federal charges relate to obstruction, which carries a penalty of up to 20 years in prison. Accused, however, they rarely receive maximum sentences, and it is uncertain whether Trump will be incarcerated; he was convicted in the first of his four criminal cases, and sentencing in the hush money case is scheduled for July 11.

Here’s a look at what Trump is facing in his three other cases:


1

Solicitation or identity theft

a public officer

8 counts

Related to counterfeiting or forgery

declarations and documents

8 counts

Related to counterfeiting or forgery

declarations and documents

1

Solicitation or identity theft

a public officer

The prosecutor in Fulton County, Georgia, has charged Trump and 18 others as part of efforts to overturn his 2020 election defeat in the state. Initially, Trump was indicted on 13 counts, but three of them – all relating to his and his co-defendants’ alleged pressure on state officials to change the outcome of the election – were dismissed. rejected by the judge. The prosecutor filed an appeal.

What do the accusations mean?

The most sweeping accusation in the case is Trump’s alleged violation of Georgia’s powerful anti-racketeering law. This law allows prosecutors to charge a large group of people in a complex set of potential crimes. The indictment says Trump and others were part of a criminal enterprise that refused to accept his election defeat and conspired to change the outcome.

The other charges – solicitation or impersonation of a public official, forgeries, misrepresentations and false documents — imply the conspiracy to appoint fake electors, as well as the multitude of false claims of voter fraud that Trump and others have made as they allegedly tried to overturn the election. Learn more about individual fees.

Four charges in federal case over January 6 attack


1 account

Conspiracy to defraud

the American government

1

Conspiracy against

civil rights

1 account

Conspiracy to defraud

the American government

1

Conspiracy against

civil rights

Federal prosecutors are investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol and efforts by Trump and his allies to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.

What do the accusations mean?

Conspiracy is a broad legal term for two or more people who conspired to break the law and then took steps to do so. A conspiracy does not need to be successful to constitute a crime.

In that case, Trump and a group of alleged co-conspirators — anonymous but many of them identifiable through prosecutors’ descriptions — are accused of plotting to overturn the election results and keep Trump in power. The three conspiracy counts relate to the myriad ways they allegedly attempted to achieve this goal. The fourth charge, attempting to obstruct an official proceeding, stems from Trump’s attempt to prevent Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s victory. Learn more about individual fees.

40 counts in the classified documents case


32 counts

Voluntary retention of

national defense information

Each corresponds

to a classified

document

Added as a replacement

indictment after the first

charges filed in June

6

Related to obstruction,

retained or

modification of documents

32 counts

Voluntary retention of

national defense information

6

Related to obstruction,

withhold or modify documents

Added as a replacement

indictment after the first

charges filed in June

Each corresponds

to a classified

document

Federal prosecutors have accused Trump of illegally hoarding classified documents from his presidency and conspiring with aides to cover up his actions.

What do the accusations mean?

Each of the first 32 counts involves a different classified document that prosecutors say Trump illegally kept after leaving the White House. Some of the documents contained military intelligence and other sensitive information that could harm national security if revealed, prosecutors say. The other charges relate to Trump’s alleged attempts to hide the documents from investigators and delete Mar-a-Lago security footage. Learn more about individual fees.

washingtonpost

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