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Tropical Nicholas Depression threatens Gulf Coast with flooding, including parts of Louisiana still faltering from Ida

Nicholas was throwing heavy rains on Wednesday in parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle after making landfall as a Category 1 hurricane early Tuesday in Texas.

Moving through Louisiana at just 2 mph, Nicholas was expected to continue raining on those same spots potentially until Friday.
This is in addition to the 1.6 to 10.6 inches that this storm dumped on Louisiana before Wednesday.
“Life-threatening flash flood impacts, especially in urban areas, remain a possibility” along the central Gulf Coast, the forecasting center said.
SEE NICOLAS ON SATELLITE

Flash flood watches were in effect Wednesday along the Louisiana Gulf Coast – including the New Orleans area – to western Florida.

Louisiana has yet to fully restore power after Ida, a Category 4 storm, made landfall on August 29. New Orleans was still scrambling to remove excess waste from Ida, with about a third to go, city spokesman Beau Tidwell said on Tuesday.

As of Wednesday afternoon, about 74,000 homes and businesses were without power in Louisiana, according to PowerOutage.us.
Tropical Nicholas Depression threatens Gulf Coast with flooding, including parts of Louisiana still faltering from Ida

Ida and the conditions that followed are responsible for at least 29 deaths in Louisiana, with the latest death being announced by Governor John Bel Edwards on Tuesday. Excessive heat is responsible for 13 deaths, while six people have died from carbon monoxide poisoning, he said.

Houstonians warned to stay home amid Nicholas

The Texans were cleaning up after Nicholas landed with 75 mph winds early Tuesday near the eastern part of the Matagorda Peninsula, about 10 miles west-southwest of Sargent Beach, Texas.

Nicholas drenched Houston, dumping more than 6 inches of rain since Sunday, the National Weather Service said. Almost 10 inches of rain fell in Deer Park, Texas. As of Wednesday afternoon, more than 83,000 Texas homes and businesses were in the dark, according to PowerOutage.us.

After the heavy rains, Houston officials asked residents to stay in their homes on Tuesday evening as efforts to clean up and restore power were underway.

Tropical Nicholas Depression threatens Gulf Coast with flooding, including parts of Louisiana still faltering from Ida

“Dangerous conditions still exist and Houstonians are urged to stay home tonight,” city officials said in a press release. “Power outages mean some street lights and traffic lights remain off, and downed power lines can be on the road and hard to see in the dark.”

All Port Houston terminals were scheduled to return to normal Wednesday hours after closing Tuesday, according to its Twitter account. Flights also returned to normal on Wednesday after more than 340 flights to or from the William P. Hobby and George Bush intercontinental airports in Houston were canceled on Tuesday, according to flight tracking site FlightAware.

Bart Stanley’s family have owned Stanley General Store in Matagorda, Texas since 1964. The storm ripped the canopy of the store’s gas station, causing the worst damage it has ever seen in that time.

“I have come here to open our store so that people can get coffee, gasoline and whatever they need because there is no other place about 30 miles away,” he said. he declared.

CNN’s Steve Almasy, Monica Garrett, Gregory Lemos, Rebekah Riess, and Raja Razek contributed to this report.

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