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This is the iconic taco. Tijuana now has a museum dedicated to this.

The humble taco has been elevated to museum status.

El Museo del Taco, a three-story building located on Tijuana’s iconic Revolución Avenue, deconstructs a taco into nine interactive rooms where visitors can learn everything from how to light charcoal for carne asada to how to way to prepare corn tortillas.

“We Tijuanenses are very proud to have the best taquerías,” said Antonio Gamboa, general director of the Museo del Taco. “It’s a place for the whole family, where they can learn a little more about tacos.”

An exhibit deconstructs every ingredient in a Tijuana-style taco.

An exhibit deconstructs every ingredient in a Tijuana-style taco.

(Alejandro Tamayo/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

It’s less of a museum and more of an experience, which begins with visitors taking off their shoes and putting on the socks provided by the museum. Visitors receive a key and a locker to store their shoes. From there, the tour winds through different rooms: charcoal, tortilla, meat, avocado, salsa, onions, taquería, adobada.

Toward the end of the tour, visitors can rank their top 10 taco shops in Baja California. They can choose from some already selected or write their own.

Each room has a small plaque with a QR code to find out more about the theme. Each stop has also been designed as an Instagram-worthy photo op: a room with padded walls where you can put on a hat and take a photo with a pink cow, a salsa-themed mirror room or a ball pit white “onion”. . At the end of the tour, you have two options: take the slide to another ball pit or just go down the stairs.

Antonio Gamboa Bustamante, director of the Museo del Taco

Antonio Gamboa Bustamante, director of the Museo del Taco, presents his museum to the media on April 4, 2024, in Tijuana.

(Alejandro Tamayo/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Who wouldn’t want a taco after all that? On the first floor of the museum is its own taqueria, with a menu including tacos de asada, adobada, suadero, tripa, lengua and quesadillas for $2.50 to $6. To drink: sodas, aguas frescas or Mexican beer. On the second floor there is a canteen and on the third a room for private events.

The museum is located on the former site of Cine Tonalá de Tijuana. Other activities in Gamboa include the famous Telefónica Gastro Park food hall, located on Agua Caliente Boulevard.

The museum is open Tuesday to Saturday from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. The entrance fee is 180 pesos, or about $11.25. The taco shop is open later on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

A mirror room celebrates salsa.

A mirror room celebrates salsa.

(Alejandro Tamayo/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

“In Mexico we can have different criteria and opinions on many different topics. There are issues on which we will never agree,” Baja California Governor Marina del Pilar Ávila said last month at the museum’s inauguration. “But I have yet to meet a Mexican who doesn’t like tacos.”

Ávila joked about what she calls one of the state’s biggest controversies: Which city has the best tacos? She played it safe with her response.

“The best tacos are in Baja California,” she said.

A big bull in a pink room is a popular photo op.

A big bull in a pink room is a popular photo op.

(Alejandro Tamayo/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

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