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Russian-Ukrainian War Live: Jens Stoltenberg warns of conflict escalating into Russia-NATO war | Ukraine

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NATO chief warns of conflict escalating into Russia-NATO war

The NATO chief has expressed concern that the fighting in Ukraine is spiraling out of control and becoming a war between Russia and NATO, according to an interview published Friday.

“If things go wrong, they can go horribly wrong,” said NATO’s secretary general. Jens Stoltenbergsaid in remarks to Norwegian TV channel NRK.

It’s a terrible war in Ukraine. It is also a war that can become a full-fledged war that turns into a major war between NATO and Russia. We are working on it every day to avoid this.

The Associated Press also reported that the Stoltenberg said in the interview that “there is no doubt that a full-fledged war is a possibility.”

Stoltenberg, a former prime minister of Norway, added that it was important to avoid a conflict “which involves more countries in Europe and becomes a full-fledged war in Europe”.

Jens Stoltenberg
War Warning: Jens Stoltenberg. Photograph: Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Moscow has repeatedly accused NATO allies of effectively becoming a party to the conflict by supplying Ukraine with weapons, training its troops and providing military intelligence to attack Russian forces.

In comments reflecting rising tensions between Russia and the West, President Vladimir Poutine suggested that Moscow might consider using what he described as the US concept of a preemptive strike.

Speaking of disarming strikes, perhaps it is worth thinking about adopting the ideas developed by our American counterparts, their ideas to ensure their security.

Key events

Heavy fighting continued in eastern and southern Ukraine, mainly in areas that Russia illegally annexed in September.

According to the Associated Press, Ukraine’s presidential office said on Friday that five civilians had been killed and 13 others injured by Russian shelling in the past 24 hours.

regional governor of Donetsk, Pavlo Kyrylenkosaid Russian forces were pressing an offensive on Bakhmut with daily attacks, despite heavy casualties.

He said in televised remarks:

You can best describe these attacks as cannon fodder. They rely mostly on infantry and less on armour, and they cannot advance.

In the nearby town of Luhansk in eastern Ukraine, the regional governor, Serhiy Haidaisaid that the Ukrainian army was pushing its counter-offensive towards Kreminna and Svatove.

Stretchers outside a hospital in the city of Bakhmut where wounded Ukrainian soldiers are being brought in for treatment
Stretchers outside a hospital in the town of Bakhmut where wounded Ukrainian soldiers are being brought in for treatment. Photography: Libkos/AP

In the south, the regional governor of Kherson, Yaroslav Yanyshevich, said eight civilians had been injured by Russian shelling in the past 24 hours. In the city of Kherson, which Ukraine recaptured last month, a children’s hospital and a morgue were damaged.

In the neighboring region of Zaporizhzhia, Russian forces shelled Nikopol and Chervonohryhorivka, which lie across the Dnieper from the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant.

governor of Zaporizhzhia, Valentin Reznichenkosaid Russian shelling damaged residential buildings and power lines.

In the Kharkiv region in the northeast, the governor Oleh Syniehubov said three civilians were injured by Russian shelling, one of whom later died.

NATO chief warns of conflict escalating into Russia-NATO war

The NATO chief has expressed concern that the fighting in Ukraine is spiraling out of control and becoming a war between Russia and NATO, according to an interview published Friday.

“If things go wrong, they can go horribly wrong,” said NATO’s secretary general. Jens Stoltenbergsaid in remarks to Norwegian TV channel NRK.

It’s a terrible war in Ukraine. It is also a war that can become a full-fledged war that turns into a major war between NATO and Russia. We are working on it every day to avoid this.

The Associated Press also reported that the Stoltenberg said in the interview that “there is no doubt that a full-fledged war is a possibility.”

Stoltenberg, a former prime minister of Norway, added that it was important to avoid a conflict “which involves more countries in Europe and becomes a full-fledged war in Europe”.

Jens Stoltenberg
War Warning: Jens Stoltenberg. Photograph: Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Moscow has repeatedly accused NATO allies of effectively becoming a party to the conflict by supplying Ukraine with weapons, training its troops and providing military intelligence to attack Russian forces.

In comments reflecting rising tensions between Russia and the West, President Vladimir Poutine suggested Moscow might consider using what he described as the US concept of a preemptive strike.

Speaking of disarming strikes, perhaps it is worth thinking about adopting the ideas developed by our American counterparts, their ideas to ensure their security.

Summary

Hello and welcome to the Guardian’s ongoing live coverage of the Russian-Ukrainian war.

Vladimir Putin has raised the possibility of a settlement to end the war in Ukraine, while saying his military offensive is still being planned.

The Russian President said:

The whole settlement process, yes, it will likely be difficult and time consuming – but one way or another, all participants in this process will have to come to terms with the emerging realities on the ground. .

Putin’s remarks on Friday – at a press conference in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan – came just days after he said the military operation could be a “long-term process”.

Here’s a quick rundown of other recent developments in the war.

  • Explosions were reported at the Berdyansk air base in Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia region. Three large explosions were heard, along with smaller ones, near the Russian-occupied town on the Sea of ​​Azov coast.

  • Ukraine says its southern regions are suffering the worst power cuts days after the latest wave of Russian attacks on the country’s energy grid. The head of Ukrainian network operator Ukrenergo, Volodymyr Kudrytskyi, said workers were having the hardest time restoring power in the Black Sea regions of Odessa, which was hit hard on Monday, and around the recently recaptured city of Kherson.

  • Vladimir Putin said that Russia could amend its military doctrine by introducing the possibility of a preemptive strike to disarm an enemy, in an apparent reference to a nuclear attack. Speaking just days after warning that the risk of nuclear war was growing but that Russia would not strike first, Putin said on Friday that Moscow was considering adopting what he called Washington’s concept of a strike. preventive.

  • Ukraine’s foreign minister said his government was working with the UN’s nuclear watchdog to create a safe zone around Russia’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant. says Dmytro Kuleba during a joint press conference in Kiev with his Slovak counterpart, Rastislav Káčer, that Kiev remained “in close contact” with Rafael Grossi, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  • Russia says its proposal for a safe zone around the Zaporizhzhia plant is aimed at ‘stopping Ukrainian shelling’. Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova also said US withdrawal from a treaty banning intermediate-range nuclear missiles was a ‘destructive’ act that created a vacuum and fueled risks extra for safety.

  • President Joe Biden said he spoke with US basketball star Brittney Griner and found her ‘in good spirits’ after his release from custody. Russia freed Griner on Thursday in a high-profile prisoner swap for notorious arms dealer Viktor Bout, who had been held in a US prison for 12 years.

  • Viktor Bout’s mother thanked Vladimir Putin for releasing her son in the exchange with the United States. Bout, nicknamed the “dealer of death”, is a former Soviet lieutenant colonel whom the US Department of Justice has described as one of the most prolific arms dealers in the world. Russian state media reported that he had returned to the country.

  • Belarus has told the United Nations that it will accept, without preconditions, the transit of Ukrainian grain through its territory for export from Lithuanian ports, said a UN spokesman. UN Secretary General António Guterres met with Belarusian Deputy Foreign Minister Yury Ambrazevich on Friday in New York. The spokesman said after the meeting that Ambrazevich also “reiterated his government’s demands to be able to export its own fertilizer products, which are currently subject to sanctions.”

  • The United States has expressed concern over a “large-scale defense partnership” between Moscow and Tehran, calling it “harmful” to Ukraine, Iran’s neighbors and the world. Western powers have accused Iran of supplying drones to Russia – which Moscow denies – as Russian forces batter Ukraine’s energy infrastructure. Washington has previously condemned security cooperation between Iran and Russia, but on Friday described an extensive relationship involving equipment such as helicopters and fighter jets as well as drones, with the latter attracting new US sanctions. .

  • French oil giant TotalEnergies bowed to international pressure and announced its intention to “gradually withdraw” from its Russian investments. The world’s fifth largest oil company announced on Friday that it would withdraw its two representatives from the board of directors of Novatek, the main private gas exporter in Russia.

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