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Republican lawmakers have asked the White House for forgiveness: NPR


Video shows a discussion of presidential pardons Thursday during the House Select Committee’s fifth hearing to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

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Republican lawmakers have asked the White House for forgiveness: NPR

Video shows a discussion of presidential pardons Thursday during the House Select Committee’s fifth hearing to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Various Republican members of Congress sought clemency from President Donald Trump in the final days of his administration, according to recorded testimony from former Trump White House aides presented by the Jan. 6 committee.

Five days after the Capitol attack, Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., sent an email with the subject line “Pardons” to the White House asking for a pardon for Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., himself, and “every congressman or senator who voted to reject ballot submissions from the Arizona and Pennsylvania Electoral Colleges.”

In an interview recorded and broadcast during the hearing, Cassidy Hutchinson, a former assistant to the White House chief of staff, said Brooks and Gaetz had pleaded for blanket pardons for House members involved in a meeting of the December 21.

Specifically, Gaetz had been asking for forgiveness since “early December,” Hutchinson said, noting that Reps. Andy Biggs, Louie Gohmert and Scott Perry had asked the White House for forgiveness. No grace was delivered.

“The only reason you’re asking for a pardon is if you think you’ve committed a crime,” said Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., one of two Republicans on the panel, in his closing remarks. Thursday hearing.

Eric Herschmann, Trump’s White House attorney, told the committee in a videotaped interview that Gaetz had asked for forgiveness “from the beginning of time until today, for anything and everything.” .

He said the “overall tone” of the demands was: “We could be sued because we were defensive of the president’s stance on these things.”

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