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Pride Parade, Pride in the Park, Navy Pier Pride and More – NBC Chicago

More than a million people are expected to attend Chicago’s annual Pride Parade on Sunday, but it’s not the only Pride celebration taking place this weekend.

Here’s what to know about the parade if you’re planning on going, as well as other Pride events and celebrations taking place across the city this weekend.

Navy Pier Pride: Saturday

From noon to 11:30 p.m., Navy Pier’s annual free outdoor Pride celebration features storytelling, performances by local LGBTQIA+ artists including the Chicago Gay Men’s Chorus, educational programs and more.

The event concludes with fireworks, which take place every Wednesday and Saturday night at Navy Pier.

Here is more information.

Back Lot Bash: Saturday and Sunday

Along Clark Street, this weekend-long Pride event will include a whiskey tasting, drag festival, live music and more.

The event takes place on Saturday starting at 3 p.m. and continues until Sunday at 9 p.m.

Tickets start at $20 per day or $30 for a two-day pass.

Pride in The Park: Saturday and Sunday

Pride in The Park, an outdoor music festival and immersive Pride experience in Grant Park, also takes place this weekend, Saturday and Sunday.

Headliners include The Chainsmokers and Alesso, and performances include singer/songwriter Daya, rapper and TV personality Saucy Santana, DJ and producer J. Worra, YouTube sensation Rebecca Black, plus performances by the RuPaul’s Drag Race winners Shea Couleé, Monet x Change and Priyanka.

Here is the full schedule for each day.

Pride in The Park takes place at Butler Field at Grant Park on Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sundays from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Butler Field at Grant Park in downtown Chicago at 100 S. Lakeshore Drive.

Single-day tickets start at $45 and two-day tickets start at $95. More information can be found here.

Chicago Pride Parade 2022: Sunday

When and where

The 51st annual Chicago Pride Parade takes place Sunday at noon on Montrose Ave. and Broadway in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood and winds its way north through the city. It ends in Lincoln Park, near the intersection of Diversey Parkway and Sheridan Road., according to organizers.

Organizers say the busiest part of the parade route is usually in North Halsted, between Belmont Avenue and Grace Street.

Here is a map of the route.

“For the liveliest views, head to the Boystown section of North Halsted Street between Belmont Avenue and Grace Street,” parade organizers explain. “If you’re looking for a less crowded area to view the parade, look for your vantage points north of Irving Park Road along Broadway or further along Broadway between Belmont Avenue and Diversey Parkway.”

Pride Parade Street Closures

Street closures begin as early as 8 a.m. Sunday and include Montrose, Irving Park and Wellington on Broadway and Addison, Grace and Roscoe in Halsted.

Pride Parade Security

In terms of security, Chicago officials say they are ready and have no known threats at this time. “We expect large crowds for the Pride Parade as we do every year, and I want to encourage all attendees to safely enjoy the celebration throughout the day,” the Office of Emergency Management said Tuesday. Chicago at a press conference.

“While there are no known threats at this time, each year Chicago Public Safety Services along with parade organizers adjust the already robust security plan to ensure the safety of attendees, staff, residents spectators and all those in the area.”

At a press conference Wednesday, Chicago Police Superintendent. David Brown said: “We have added more staff to Pride this year than in the past. We have had more coordination with businesses and other stakeholders in the planning process for Pride Parade than in the past.

“We are obviously planning for the worst, hoping for the best,” he continued. “We have extraordinary resources dedicated to this year’s Pride – more committed than ever.”

NBC Chicago

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