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Ollie Robinson set to ‘lose career’ over racist and sexist tweets, says former England cricketer Michael Carberry, as bowler suspended by ECB

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Former England cricketer Michael Carberry has said people like Ollie Robinson are expected to “lose their careers” after the bowler was suspended for historic racist and sexist social media posts.

Robinson, 27, made his England debut against New Zealand last week, but that was marred by the tweets he posted between 2012 and 2013.

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Robinson made his England debut last week but has been marred by the tweets that have surfaced

Robinson – who was 18 and 19 at the time he posted the posts – read an apology after the game ended on day one, but continued through the game.

The England and Wales Cricket Council subsequently suspended the bowler pending an investigation.

The ECB is also investigating allegations that a second player posted offensive material when he was under 16, but his identity has been withheld.

Carberry, who has played for Surrey, Kent, Hampshire and Leicestershire during his career, as well as 13 appearances for his country, believes significant action needs to be taken.

“It’s a very sad situation we find ourselves in, not only as a sport but as a society, where now young people think it’s okay to publish this stuff,” Carberry told Jim White. on talkSPORT.

Ollie Robinson set to ‘lose career’ over racist and sexist tweets, says former England cricketer Michael Carberry, as bowler suspended by ECB

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Carberry has played six test matches for England

“I don’t really care about the deadlines, the most worrying factor for me is that an 18 year old and now a 16 year old sit down on their social media accounts and post this stuff and think that It’s okay. It’s not okay.

“Something seriously needs to be done to discourage people from doing it. Where does it end?

“You hear reports of racism and abuse online every day and yes all these Kick It Out campaigns and slogans, we wear blackout t-shirts and screens, taking the knee, all that fancy stuff, it doesn’t. not really cure the problem.

“We need to put in place much tougher penalties. If that means taking people’s careers, so be it.

“By playing an international sport, I had the privilege to do it 13 times and it was something that I held in very high regard. It is a privilege and must be maintained as a privilege.

“Enough is enough. The governing body must set foot on the ground.”

Ollie Robinson set to ‘lose career’ over racist and sexist tweets, says former England cricketer Michael Carberry, as bowler suspended by ECB

AFP

Robinson took seven wickets in the game against New Zealand

Robinson read an apology after the tweets were posted, but Carberry doesn’t think it was genuine.

“This apology seemed to be very scripted,” Carberry added. “There wasn’t a lot of remorse and it was an attempt to wash it away.

“Personally, what he had to say was damaging. Going through some of his excuses, he said he had worked on himself to become a better person.

“I’m very interested in knowing exactly what he’s done to be a better person, so I’m better informed.

“Anyone can make sweeping statements and say ‘I’m a better person now.’ It’s fair to say that the folks at BAME have suffered enough from this racism and heard enough rhetoric under the sun.

“Something has to be done to discourage people from doing it. “

Ollie Robinson set to ‘lose career’ over racist and sexist tweets, says former England cricketer Michael Carberry, as bowler suspended by ECB

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Carberry spoke to Jim White after Robinson was suspended by the ECB

Carberry also believes there must be tougher penalties for these players, regardless of their age at the time.

He added, “Unfortunately in life when dealing with people there has to be something in place to discourage people from doing it.

“If that means taking their careers, that’s what has to happen. I know there have been people of color who have lost their careers for a lot less than what Ollie Robinson and the 16-year-old did.

“I don’t think people are looking the other way. There are people who have lost their careers just because of the color of their skin and who have been discriminated against because of the color of their skin.

“What about the duty of care to these people? “


Former Yorkshire cricketer Azeem Rafiq has made allegations of institutional racism against the club, which is the subject of an independent investigation.

But the findings have yet to be released, and key supporting witnesses have yet to be invited to testify.

Rafiq’s claims allege that there were “racist jokes in the locker room” at the club and also said he had been the victim of racist abuse on the pitch.

He also says there was an attempt to impose a culture of drinking alcohol on Muslim players, while saying he did not have the same opportunities as white players.

Former Premier League striker Darren Bent has said he is happy the ECB is taking action against Robinson and said culture in the locker room is rife.

Ollie Robinson set to ‘lose career’ over racist and sexist tweets, says former England cricketer Michael Carberry, as bowler suspended by ECB

talkSPORT

Bent spoke about culture in the locker room while playing

Bent told talkSPORT Breakfast: “I have no sympathy for the fact that he [Robinson] was 18 years old. If he was a youngster, like 12, then fair enough, but you have full control over what you tweet and say.

“Maybe he’s more cultural today, playing with people of color, so maybe it’s been an education time for him.

“I am with the ECB, I am happy that they acted quickly and that there should be some form of sanction.

“This kind of culture continues. I’ve been in a locker room before, got to know a few of the players, and there might be three or four more black players in the locker room and someone might make the “more brothers” comment.

“At the time when I was in the locker room, it was acceptable, we laugh about it. When I think about it now, it wasn’t acceptable, but it was the common theme in the locker room.

“It was the football mentality, the jokes and you laugh at it. From childhood until retirement, these were the kind of jokes we had.

“Because you were in a football environment, you made fun of them and didn’t see the racism behind it.”




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