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Officer Carlos Yanez Jr., injured in shooting that killed Ella French, to leave drug rehab center – NBC Chicago

A few months after being seriously injured in a shooting that killed his partner, Chicago police officer Carlos Yanez Jr. is expected to be released from a rehab center on Thursday.

Family members said they were preparing for Yanez’s release on Thursday morning, with celebrations planned for his departure.

Yanez was injured in a shootout that took place during a traffic stop in Chicago in August, killing his partner, Constable Ella French.

Emonte Morgan, the man charged with the shooting, appeared before a judge last month, pleading not guilty to all 85 counts related to the August 7 incident.

The suspect’s brother, Eric Morgan, 19, has also been charged with several crimes related to the shooting, charged with unlawful use of a weapon by a criminal and one count of aggravated illegal use of a weapon with a previous conviction.

Officer Carlos Yanez’s father, Ella French’s partner who was seriously injured in the shooting that killed her and continues to recover in hospital, said he brought a T-shirt with him. her son, who asked for it to be handed over to French because he wanted “a little bit of me to be with her”.

Late last month, the family said Yanez was slowly recovering, but still had a long way to go.

“I would like to thank all the doctors who were with my son and who protected him, and he is alive today because of them,” his mother said.

“Most of the emotions I have experienced cannot be said on TV. Every father should ask himself how I feel? This is how I felt,” said Carlos Yanez Sr., father of the officer, himself a retired Chicago police officer. .

From street corners to church steps, Chicagoans have shown their support for the police while paying homage to late officer Ella French in their own way. NBC 5’s Chris Hush reports.

Now family members say they are focused on being there for Yanez Jr. and taking things day to day as he continues to improve.

“It has been difficult,” said his wife, Brenda Yanez. “I think it’s easy to see the physical wounds, but it’s harder to see the emotional, the psychological. It’s a daily struggle.”

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