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New York to spend $80 million to repair Brooklyn Pier and ‘plan’ massive port restructuring

The city is spending $80 million to repair three Brooklyn piers and “fund planning” for a massive overhaul of the 122-acre Red Hook Harbor, officials announced Tuesday.

Mayor Eric Adams said the Big Apple has also submitted requests for more than $350 million in federal funds to help finalize the project, although the requests have not yet been approved.

“We are aware of the economic challenges we face, but those challenges will become greater if we do not make the smart economic decision,” Adams said during a news conference at the Brooklyn Marine Terminal.

The city’s initial $80 million will come from its economic development corporation.

The state is investing another $15 million in a cold storage container at the site.

Mayor Eric Adams said the Big Apple has also submitted requests for more than $350 million in federal funds to help finalize the project, although the requests have not yet been approved. Paul Martinka

“Every decision we make is a holistic approach to how to move the city forward … capitalizing on other sources and asking the state to help us move things forward,” Adams said.

He said the project was “necessary” and that the city — which is groaning under the fiscal weight of the migrant crisis — “will balance the budget to keep moving forward.”

The initial investment will be used to repair dilapidated Piers 7, 8 and 10 and plan for the future of the waterfront site, built in the 1950s and 1960s.

The money will be used to finance a modern electrified container crane for terminal operations.

Gov. Kathy Hochul also committed $15 million for a future cold storage facility to reduce traffic and pollution from perishable goods transported in and out of Brooklyn, her office said.

The maritime sector “will remain at the heart of this site,” according to State Senator and Brooklyn Marine Terminal Task Force Vice Chair Andrew Gounardes (DB’klyn).

He added that in addition to economic gains, the city would also benefit from environmental benefits: the site was already taking 3,000 trucks off the road each year.

The state is investing another $15 million in a cold storage container at the site. Paul Martinka

The announcement was light on detail, although Adams mentioned “open space, amenities and housing opportunities.”

“We are fighting against housing. We need to focus on making (the area as strong as possible),” Jim Tampakis, who has lived in the neighborhood for three years, told the Post.

Carolina Salguero, president of PortSide New York – a group that advocates for increased maritime uses in the city – said: “Waterfront housing is never affordable. I really hope we have a real public space.

But it won’t be at full speed until after a vigorous community engagement process, which is expected to begin in late spring, officials said.

“The community working group… will work closely with us throughout this approximately six to nine month process of developing a master plan,” said Maria Torres-Springer, the city’s deputy mayor in charge of accommodation.

Adams said the project was “necessary” and that the city — which is groaning under the fiscal weight of the migrant crisis — “will balance the budget to keep moving forward.” Paul Martinka

Torres-Springer said relevant public approvals will also be needed for the planned transfer of land from the New York-New Jersey Port Authority to the city.

“After that, we will issue a request for proposals for a main operator for container and maritime works and other relevant tenders as required,” she said, adding that “this will take a few years” .

New York Post

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