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Many children have seen a rocket launch into space. Very few people can say that they have any experience on board. This is the case with the students of Lisa Turney, a technology teacher at Linwood Elementary School in Linwood, Kansas. “I don’t know if they understand how amazing it is,” Turney exclaimed. His virtual “ Bitmoji ” class on plant growth and bacteria won a national competition and is now heading to the International Space Station. Its resemblance to ‘Bitmoji’ is stuck to the experiment the astronauts will be working on. “My little sticker! My little girl is going to space,” Turney joked. Back on Earth, Turney’s students – nicknamed “co-researchers” – will grow the same plants and compare the results. “I’m trying to get this across. It’s genuine. We have no idea what’s going to happen. It’s amazing,” Turney continued. Scientists will use the data they collect to see if astronauts can grow food in space. “If we can do that, then maybe we can have people on the moon for months and weeks,” noted Mary, a fifth and Ms. Turney’s student. t just plants. Turney hopes this will sprout a student’s love for science and take root throughout his life. “I want them to understand how great science is, to feel more like the ‘I can do this’ kind of thing, and to actually go out in the word and do STEM stuff,” he said. “She explained. The experiment aboard the ISS is scheduled for March 1. The students at Linwood will have live feed, so they can watch and compare the results in real time.”

Many children have seen a rocket launch into space. Very few people can say that they have any experience on board.

This is the case with the students of Lisa Turney, a technology teacher at Linwood Elementary School in Linwood, Kansas.

“I don’t know if they understand how amazing it is,” Turney exclaimed.

His virtual “Bitmoji” class on plant growth and bacteria won a national competition.

Lisa Turney

Linwood, KS teacher Lisa Turney won a nationwide competition with this Bitmoji class on plant growth and bacteria.

Now she’s heading for the International Space Station. Kind of.
Its resemblance to “Bitmoji” is faithful to the experience on which the astronauts will work.

Kansas teacher wins competition, students participate in International Space Station experience

Magnitude.IO

Lisa Turney’s ‘Bitmoji’ and school name adhered to the experience for use aboard the International Space Station

“My little sticker! My little girl is going to space,” Turney joked.

Back on Earth, Turney’s students – dubbed “co-researchers” – will grow the same plants and compare the results.

“I’m trying to get this across. It’s genuine. We have no idea what’s going to happen. It’s amazing,” Turney continued.

Scientists will use the data they collect to see if astronauts can grow food in space.

“If we can do that, then maybe we can have people on the moon for months and weeks,” noted Mary, a fifth and Ms. Turney’s student.

The project is not just about plants. Turney hopes this will germinate a student’s love for science and take root for a lifetime.

“I want them to get a feel for the greatness of science, to have more of a ‘I can do this’ type feeling, and to step out into the world and do STEM stuff,” he said. she explains.

The rocket carrying the experiment was launched on Saturday.

The experiment aboard the ISS is scheduled for March 1.

Linwood students will have live feed, so they can watch and compare results in real time.

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