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Iowa educators are sounding the alarm over the effects of teacher shortages


It’s only February, but many Iowa educators are already very preoccupied with the fall semester. The Waukee Community School District says the number of qualified applicants for teaching jobs has dropped dramatically. over the past few years. They expect to be fully staffed for the 2022-23 school year, but it’s a troubling trend they’re taking note of. School district. Buck said that could have a ripple effect for years to come, especially in smaller, rural schools – which could feel the worst of the teacher shortage sooner rather than later. “We’re probably in a perfect storm where it’s going to be harder and harder to get people into teaching,” Buck said. Elizabeth Crutchfield is a Waukee resident who works in education and says the pay scale is frustrating. factors is really and truly paid. They are extremely underpaid,” Crutchfield said. “Teacher pay is definitely an issue. There is a need to pay teachers more,” Buck said. Add to that inflation, which is at its highest level in 40 years. “With the inflation rates we’re seeing, this is going to wipe out education increases for each of the last five years,” Buck said. He said he feared a teacher shortage could eventually hurt students. The same goes for Christopher Sandblom, whose son is about to graduate from high school and another who will soon be entering public schools. am deeply concerned,” Sandbolm said. Waukee Schools offers the top 10 salaries in the state. That’s part of the reason why they don’t expect a teacher shortage. KCCI spoke with an off-camera teacher who works in a small rural school. She said the teacher shortage is already having a negative impact on her school and she fears next year will be extremely difficult.

It’s only February, but many educators in Iowa are already very preoccupied with the fall semester.

The Waukee Community School District said the number of qualified applicants for teaching positions has dropped significantly in recent years.

They expect to be full for the 2022-2023 school year, but it’s a troubling trend they’re taking note of.

“We’re seeing some of the lowest enrollment in Iowa State’s teacher education programs in years,” said Brad Buck, superintendent of the Waukee Community School District.

Buck said that could have a ripple effect for years to come, especially in smaller, rural schools – which could feel the worst of the teacher shortage sooner rather than later.

Navigating COVID-19, criticism of curriculum and salary is driving some to quit teaching altogether.

“We’re probably in a perfect storm where it’s going to be harder and harder to get people into teaching,” Buck said.

Elizabeth Crutchfield is a Waukee resident who works in education and says the pay scale is frustrating.

“A lot of postmen are really, really paying. They’re extremely underpaid,” Crutchfield said.

“Teacher pay is definitely an issue. There is a need to pay teachers more,” Buck said.

Add to that inflation, which is at its highest level in 40 years.

“With the inflation rates we’re seeing, that’s going to wipe out education increases for each of the last five years,” Buck said.

He said he feared a teacher shortage could potentially harm students.

The same goes for Christopher Sandblom, whose son is about to graduate from high school and another who will soon be entering public schools.

“I’m not as worried about the high school one because he’s almost done, but my two-year-old, I’m deeply worried,” Sandbolm said.

Waukee Schools offers the top 10 salaries in the state. That’s part of the reason why they don’t expect a teacher shortage.

KCCI spoke with an off-camera teacher who works in a small rural school.

She said the teacher shortage is already having a negative impact on her school and she fears next year will be extremely difficult.

Cnn

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