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Inside the battle for control of the Republican National Committee

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“We’re in the age of law and we keep losing in court,” Kirk said on his show last week introducing Dhillon. “Perhaps we should have an RNC president who is a lawyer who has a killer instinct.”

Dhillon was paid handsomely for her legal work, several RNC members pointed out – she charges more than $1,000 an hour.

His law firm earned more than $1 million from the committee in 2021 and 2022 for “legal and compliance services,” according to Federal Election Commission records. In 2022 alone, the company also received more than $445,000 for work on behalf of various Trump-related entities. In total, since 2019, federal campaigns and committees have paid the Dhillon Law Group more than $2.1 million.

This year, Dhillon has worked for Kari Lake, the Republican gubernatorial candidate for Arizona, though she is not listed in Lake’s lawsuit against Maricopa County, the state’s largest. Dhillon’s legal partner has filed a lawsuit on behalf of Abraham Hamadeh, the Republican nominee for Arizona attorney general, who is seeking to challenge the results of his as-yet-uncalled race, which is heading for a recount with his narrow Democratic opponent.

In July, according to real estate records, Dhillon bought a $3.5 million condominium with “stylish entertainment spaces” and “beautiful water views” on a prestigious street in Russian Hill, a move in the same trendy area of ​​San Francisco.

Dhillon was traveling and could not be reached for comment. But his allies counter that running for chairman of the committee would go against his financial interests. His support on the committee is growing, they say; they estimate she has taken off at least 18 former McDaniel allies so far and has around 50 supporters in total. She already has enough support to be on the ballot in January.

In television appearances and in calls for Republican donors, Dhillon cited her work on the First Amendment with the Center for American Liberty, a conservative legal group she founded in 2018, and argued that the Republican Party needed to continue to “offend” and do more to fight Democrats on election rules ahead of time, pointing to the success of Democratic lawyers like Marc Elias. And she criticized GOP-linked business law firms like Jones Day, whose attorneys have given millions of dollars in personal donations to Democrats.

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nytimes

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