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Idaho officials identify deer with chronic wasting disease


The first confirmed case this year of the chronic wasting disease was detected in a deer in Idaho County in north-central Idaho, state wildlife officials said.

Idaho Fish and Game said Friday that a white-tailed deer found dead along the road tested positive for the disease. The agency said the deer’s cause of death is unknown.

The contagious and fatal neurological disorder was first detected in the same region state last fall. This area represents the seven cases detected in the state. The discovery of the disease last year prompted the Idaho Fish and Game Commission to designate a chronic wasting disease management area.

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The disease found in game animals poses potential health problems for hunters because it belongs to the same family as mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends people not eat meat from animals with the disease, although it has never been documented to infect humans.

The most recent positive deer test was found in Fish and Game Management Unit 14, the only unit in Idaho where chronic wasting disease has been detected. The seven animals that tested positive in the state were between the towns of Riggins and Grangeville.

A deer in Idaho has tested positive for chronic wasting disease. Officials warn that the disease can pose health risks to humans.

“We expected to see more positive animals from Unit 14 this year, so unsurprisingly, this is an important reminder that chronic wasting disease is present here in Idaho,” the wildlife director said. of the state, Rick Ward, in a press release.

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The agency said Friday it has tested more than 1,000 deer and elk statewide so far this year, and testing of most of those animals is pending.

Game Management Units 14 – and 15 to the east – have special restrictions and requirements for hunters as wildlife officials work to prevent the disease from spreading to other parts of the country. ‘State.

Hunters in these units are required to have all deer, elk and moose tested for disease.

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There are also restrictions on removing a deer, elk, or moose carcass from both units. Violation of this restriction can result in a misdemeanor with a $1,000 fine, six months in jail, and three-year hunting license revocation.

Fish and Game officials said there is no cure for chronic wasting disease and the disease’s effects on the state’s elk, deer and moose herds pose a threat to future hunting opportunities.

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