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How cops used DNA left in a park 30 years ago to find the Woodland Rapist – a serial abuser who attacked children

The case of the ‘Woodland Rapist’ – a serial mugger who attacked at least three children in the 1990s – may have been solved thanks to DNA left in a park 30 years ago and DNA subjected to a ancestry website.

Richard Neil, 64, was arrested in Toronto on March 3 in connection with multiple assaults in the early 1990s, marking one of the biggest breakthroughs in the decades-long manhunt .

The alleged rapist allegedly lured at least three victims to a wooded area, tied them to a tree and assaulted them.

Police reportedly “took several soil samples for DNA testing and found a profile” of the suspect after he allegedly assaulted a then-10-year-old boy in Norton Place Park in Brampton on September 29, 1994.

Richard Neil, 64, was arrested in Toronto on March 3 in connection with multiple assaults dating back to the early 1990s.

At least three victims said they were lured to a wooded area, tied to a tree and assaulted by the man the media dubbed

At least three victims said they were lured to a wooded area, tied to a tree and assaulted by the man the media dubbed “the woodland rapist.”

The victim, who is now 34, was attacked in Norton Place Park when a stranger forced him to perform sexual acts on him.

The victim, who is now 34, was attacked in Norton Place Park when a stranger forced him to perform sexual acts on him.

It was not until a 15-year-old girl reported a similar assault in Oakville in August 1995 that authorities conclusively linked the three attacks to the same perpetrator through DNA testing, but still did not failed to make a breakthrough.

Police have not confirmed what ultimately led them to Neil, but one victim, who was 10 at the time of his attack, said it was after a member of Neil’s family submitted his DNA to an ancestry website.

The victim, now 34 and whose identity is protected by a court-ordered publication ban, told CBC News of the moment police called him to confirm his arrest: “I was shaking as I received the call.

He was attacked in Norton Place Park when a stranger forced him to perform sexual acts on him.

The victim recounted her experience and the long road to justice, telling CBC News that police did a “poor” job investigating the incident initially.

He said police initially questioned his claims and insinuated that he made up the whole incident to get attention.

“They accused me of making up what happened to me to get attention, without taking me seriously at all,” he said in an email to CBC.

The victim persisted, eventually leading authorities to the location where DNA evidence from the semen was crucially recovered.

A sketch of the suspect was distributed by the police

A sketch of the suspect was distributed by the police

Neil faces a total of 20 charges, including kidnapping, sexual assault with a weapon and producing child pornography, although he denies all allegations.

The assaults, which took place in Brampton, Kitchener and Oakville, involved victims lured to wooded areas, tied up and assaulted.

The case, known as “Project Woodland”, involved a collaborative effort by police from Peel, Halton and Waterloo.

Neil’s defense team claimed he “had no knowledge of these crimes and maintains his innocence.”

Neil was released on bail in early April on the basis that he agreed to live with his family on Vancouver Island or in Toronto with an electronic ankle monitor.

Neil’s lawyer, Leo Adler, said he was “subject to very strict bail conditions and the public can rest assured that everything is being done properly,” according to CBC.

The victim told the outlet she “couldn’t believe it” when she learned her alleged attacker was out on bail. “I literally had a stomach ache.”

When he was informed of his arrest, he said: “I felt overwhelmed with joy, then sadness. As I started to recall the memories of that day.

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