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Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion


The record-breaking heat wave in the United States continued in force over the weekend, claiming two lives as abnormally high temperatures continue to roast much of the country.

The deaths, reported in New York and Pennsylvania, come as an estimated 77 million Americans across the country suffer from scorching temperatures.

Both victims died of hyperthermia brought on by the horrendous heat – which in some states is 13F above average for this time of year.

Extreme weather, which in addition to the Northeast is affecting the Midwest, South and Southwest America, has forced officials in several states to declare heat-related emergencies, warning citizens to ward off the heat by staying hydrated and indoors.

Many of those advisories have come in the Northeast, in cities like Philadelphia and Boston, where temperatures have reached triple-digit levels, forcing officials to postpone events such as the famous Boston Triathlon. to August 21.

Elsewhere in New York, where temperatures reached 100 degrees during the week but felt even hotter on Sunday, another citizen died, after high temperatures forced officials to shorten the 2022 New York Triathlon .

Extreme weather, which in addition to the Northeast is affecting the Midwest, South and Southwest America, has forced officials in several states to declare heat-related emergencies, warning citizens to ward off the choking while staying hydrated and indoors.

Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion

The record-breaking heat wave in the United States continued in force over the weekend, claiming two lives as abnormally high temperatures continue to roast much of the country. Pictured is the New York skyline on Sunday

Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion

Children play in fire hydrant spray in New York’s Bronx, where temperatures hit 104F on Sunday

Similar conditions were – and have been – widespread across the country in recent days.

In Philadelphia, where temperatures topped the 100-degree mark at 98 on Saturday, the city issued a warning to citizens that temperatures are expected to soar to over 100 on Sunday – a record for the city of brotherly love for that day particular of the month.

That heat served as a continuation of the temperatures seen during the week – which claimed the life of 73-year-old Allentown resident Thomas Bunting.

Bunting, who lived about 45 miles from Philadelphia, died Thursday at his home from extreme heat, the city coroner’s office said, adding that the deceased’s diabetes also played a role in his death.

A few days later, the city declared a state of emergency, activating several city services designed to keep people cool, including providing air-conditioned libraries as cooling stations and parking air-conditioned buses accessible to citizens in all the city.

A few hundred miles off the Atlantic coast, Boston also issued an emergency alert on Thursday — an extension of a previous one announced on Monday. The new alert will last until Sunday, when temperatures can reach 97 degrees,

However, taking humidity and other factors into account, the heat will be more like 105 degrees, officials warn.

Near the Big Apple, Governor Kathy Hochul also warned citizens of worsening temperatures over the weekend, after the The Chief Medical Examiner confirmed one heat-related death on Saturday.

Also in this case, other contributing factors — listed as hypertensive cardiovascular disease and emphysema — contributed to the death of the unidentified victim, which officials say was caused by hyperthermia brought on by “environmental exposure.” “.

No further information about the death – including place and time, or the age of the victim – was immediately released.

Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion

A homeless man in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is driven by a friend after being taken to a local hospital for dehydration on Thursday. The heat wave, which affects several regions of the United States, has since worsened, killing at least two people

Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion

A woman cools off in New York’s iconic Washington State Park during this week’s record-breaking heat wave

Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion

A man cools off near the Washington State Park fountain on Thursday when temperatures hit 100F as New York City urged residents to stay indoors

The city has also been forced to shorten its annual New York Triathlon Sunday due to sweltering temperatures, which officials say will feel 104 degrees at its peak.

New Jersey and Delaware also issued heat emergencies through Sunday evening, with Newark airport officials reporting its fifth consecutive 100-degree day on Saturday, when tarmac temperatures reached 101 degrees. Similar temperatures were expected on Sunday.

In addition to the Northeast, the heat wave has also delighted the American Southwest – a region currently at the mercy of a drought the likes of which has not been seen for more than 12 centuries.

On Sunday, cities like Las Vegas (106 degrees), Phoenix (105 degrees), San Antonio (101 degrees) and Oklahoma City (105 degrees) all hit the 100 mark.

Other cities, such as Memphis, have approached this level, with a high of 98 – but most have heat indices well above 100.

Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion

People rest in the shade in Bryant Park in midtown Manhattan as temperatures hit the 90s, the weather that prompted the city to cut short its annual triathlon

Heatwave turns deadly as Pennsylvania man and New York resident die of heat exhaustion

A child plays in a water fountain, during a heat wave, in Boston, Massachusetts

Experts warn the heat – which experts say is the result of climate change and is mirrored in a similar phenomenon happening in the UK – is expected to last until the end of July, with millions expected to continue seeing record temperatures.

Severe weather affected the Northeast and Midwest for much of the week Thursday and Friday, as well as the Great Plains and the Midwest, which officials say will likely see potential tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds Saturday through Sunday, according to the Storm Prediction Center.

Cities like Chicago, Detroit and much of Wisconsin – which also faced unusually high temperatures for the season – also face a slightly lower risk of extreme storms.

Meanwhile, parts of the northwest are currently in critical conditions for potential fires due to the high temperatures seen in the region.

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