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Great Orgasms Are Inherited From Your Parents: DNA Experts


The ability to have earth-shattering orgasms is partly genetic, British researchers have found – meaning the ability to achieve orgasm lies with your parents, as well as your partner.

The study – which focused on female orgasms – was originally published in 2005, but is receiving renewed attention in light of the new film ‘Good Luck to You, Leo Grande’. In the film – now streaming on Hulu – Emma Thompson plays a woman in her 60s who hires a sex worker, played by Daryl McCormack, to help her achieve her very first orgasm.

The study, which was conducted by St. Thomas’ Hospital in London and Keele University, surveyed 683 sets of identical twins and 714 sets of non-identical twins aged 19 to 83.

Two questions were asked of the women: “Overall, how often do you have an orgasm during intercourse?” and “How often do you experience an orgasm during masturbation by yourself or a partner?”

Emma Thompson plays a woman in her 60s in search of her first orgasm in the new movie “Good Luck To You, Leo Grande.” The film co-stars Daryl McCormack.
©Searchlight Images/courtesy Everett Collection

Twenty-two percent of respondents said they never or rarely had an orgasm during sex, while 21% said they never or rarely had an orgasm during a hot solo session.

The researchers were interested in finding out if there was a difference in responses between sets of identical and non-identical twins.

The identical twins share a DNA code between them, which means the differences in their responses were likely the result of the different environments in which they were brought to orgasm.

Great Orgasms Are Inherited From Your Parents: DNA Experts
Meg Ryan memorably faked an orgasm while playing Sally Albright in 1989’s ‘When Harry Met Sally’.
Columbia Pictures/Everett Collection

Non-identical twins, on the other hand, share only 50% of their DNA, which means that differences in their responses are due to genetics as well as the different environments in which they might reach orgasm.

Indeed, researchers have found that genetic factors play an important role, accounting for up to 60% of a woman’s ability to reach the big O.

Despite research revealing that it’s not always a partner who is responsible for a person’s pleasure, women still fake orgasms.

Research published earlier this year in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science collected data from more than 600 women, many of whom admitted to giving up their own erotic pleasure in order to appease men.

Great Orgasms Are Inherited From Your Parents: DNA Experts
Despite research revealing that it’s not always a partner who is responsible for a person’s pleasure, women still fake orgasms.
Shutterstock

“Women prioritize what they think their partners need over their own sexual needs and gratification,” said study lead author Jessica Jordan, a doctoral student at the University of Florida. South, in a press release.

Meanwhile, Emma Thompson, 63, said last week that ‘Good Luck to You, Leo Grande’ examines the ‘orgasm gap’ between men and women.

“I’ve always been interested in the kind of ostracism of sexual issues. We don’t talk about it enough,” she said. “And female sexual pleasure is not at the top of anyone’s list.”

New York Post

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