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Gay nephew of MP who cried while pleading to vote against gay marriage speaks out

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The nephew of a Missouri congresswoman who sobbed while imploring her colleagues to vote against same-sex marriage condemned her aunt for bigotry, saying, “I don’t want my last name associated with hate.”

Vicky Hartzler, a Republican, wept on Capitol Hill Thursday as she opposed the same-sex marriage bill that the House eventually passed.

The 62-year-old was in tears, her voice shaking, as she told the House: ‘I hope and pray that my colleagues will find the courage to join me in opposing this bill. lost and dangerous.”

On Friday, Hartzler’s nephew, Andrew Hartzler, said she was wrong and should learn tolerance and acceptance.

He came out to her in February, despite his long history of rejecting LGBTQ rights and his decision in 2019 to sponsor an event organized by proponents of conversion therapy.

Andrew Hartzler, 23, filmed a TikTok Friday that went viral with 154,000 views on Friday night, noting, “So despite coming out to my aunt’s house last February, I guess she’s still just as homophobic.”

GOP Rep. Vicky Hartzler collapsed and cried on the floor of the House Thursday in opposition to the same-sex marriage bill passed by the House

Andrew Hartzler posted a TikTok criticizing his aunt on Friday that went viral, with 154,000 views

Andrew Hartzler posted a TikTok criticizing his aunt on Friday that went viral, with 154,000 views

He told BuzzFeed News he wasn’t surprised by his performance on Thursday.

“At first I just thought it was an old video because that kind of rhetoric is pretty common with my aunt,” he said.

“But I realized it was from today and what she was talking about, and, yeah, I wasn’t really surprised.”

He said he thought it was “weird” that she was crying, but was sure her emotion was real.

“I don’t think it’s a performance. Knowing my aunt, I think those were real tears.

He said he was not close to his aunt, who invited him to Thanksgiving at her house, but whose invitation he declined, feeling unwelcome.

He also has a difficult relationship with his deeply conservative parents, but felt he had to respond to his aunt’s rhetoric.

“I feel compelled to speak up when I see this just to counter these messages,” he said.

“I don’t want my last name to be associated with hate. I want it to be associated with love.

Andrew Hartzler said he didn't want his last name to be

Andrew Hartzler says he doesn’t want his last name ‘associated with hate’

He also has a difficult relationship with his deeply conservative parents, but felt he had to respond to his aunt's rhetoric.

He also has a difficult relationship with his deeply conservative parents, but felt he had to respond to his aunt’s rhetoric.

Andrew has been in the spotlight before, after suing the evangelical Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma – a university he didn’t choose, but the only one his father said he would pay for tuition.

Like all students, Hartzler had signed a recognizance upon arrival stating, “I will not engage in or attempt to engage in illicit and unscriptural sexual acts, including any homosexual activity and any sexual intercourse with anyone who does not is not my spouse. I will not be united in marriage other than marriage between a man and a woman.

University president William Wilson preached in one of the bi-weekly mandatory sermons that “if a man has sex with a man as one does with a woman, both have done what is detestable, they are put to death.’

Wilson asked the assembled students to close their eyes, bow their heads, and raise their hands if they needed “healing in this area of ​​sexuality.”

He is now part of a federal class action lawsuit in which plaintiffs are suing the Department of Education to block religious schools from receiving federal funds if they discriminate against LGBTQ students. Under current law, these schools enjoy religious exemptions from complying with Title IX anti-discrimination laws.

In his Friday TikTok, Andrew Hartzler said his aunt was wrong for claiming religious rights were curtailed by same-sex marriage.

Hartzler is part of a class action lawsuit suing his university for discrimination, arguing they shouldn't receive federal funds

Hartzler is part of a class action lawsuit suing his university for discrimination, arguing they shouldn’t receive federal funds

Andrew Hartzler said he was appalled by his aunt's behavior, but not surprised

Hartzler said she had to learn tolerance

Andrew Hartzler said his aunt should respect other people’s way of life

“It’s more like you want the power to impose your religious beliefs on everyone, and because you don’t have that power, you feel like you’re being silenced,” he said. he stated in the TikTok.

‘But you’re not. You’re going to have to learn to coexist with all of us. And I’m sure it’s not that difficult.

He said he hoped his words here and in his TikTok would make his aunt consider the impact of his rhetoric.

“I really wish she would see how harmful her words are and not use her political power to continue to instill religious exemptions into civil rights laws and allow schools to actively discriminate against LGBTQ people. “, did he declare.

“I think she’s trying to play the victim when really she’s the perpetrator of a lot of harm, and I feel like she has to take responsibility.”

Vicky Hartzler, an evangelical Christian, ran for the Missouri Senate seat this year but lost a GOP primary to Eric Schmitt.

Former President Trump declined to endorse her run, writing on Truth Social, “I don’t think she has what it takes to take on the hard-left Democrats.”

Her aunt told the House on Thursday, “This is yet another step toward the Democrats’ goal of dismantling the traditional family, silencing the voices of faith, and permanently undoing the God-woven foundation of our country. ”

Gay nephew of MP who cried while pleading to vote against gay marriage speaks out

“This is yet another step toward the Democrats’ goal of dismantling the traditional family, silencing the voices of faith, and permanently undoing the God-woven foundation of our country,” the Missouri Republican said as his voice trembled.

Nancy Pelosi celebrates passage of bill with Chuck Schumer and bipartisan members of Congress

Nancy Pelosi celebrates passage of bill with Chuck Schumer and bipartisan members of Congress

Pelosi choked up earlier announcing the passage of the bill

Pelosi choked up earlier announcing the passage of the bill

“It is the priority of the Democrats.

“Well, Mr. President, I’ll tell you my priority: protecting religious freedom, protecting believers, and protecting Americans who believe in the true meaning of marriage.

“I hope and pray that my colleagues will find the courage to join me in opposing this misguided and dangerous bill.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi wept for the opposite reason after the bill passed – wiping away tears as she celebrated the passage of the bill – one of the last bills to pass under her watch.

She had choked up earlier, announcing the passage of the bill.

“I was emotional, I’m sorry,” she said after banging the gavel on the desk several times.

Thirty-nine Republicans joined all Democrats in voting “yes” on the bill, sending it to President Biden’s office on a 258-169 vote.

Another Republican voted “present” and four did not vote.

Last week, 12 Republicans joined all Democrats in voting for the legislation in the Senate, breaking a 60-vote filibuster.

The Respect for Marriage Act requires states to recognize any marriage that took place in another state and formally repeals the “Defense of Marriage Act” which stated that marriage was between a man and a woman.

The right to same-sex marriage has been legal in all 50 states since the 2012 decision Obergefell v. Hodges. The bill, however, does not codify Obergefell, which means that if the Supreme Court reversed the fact that ruling states could ban same-sex marriage but would have to recognize same-sex married partners if the ceremony took place in a other state.

The bill arose in light of the Dobbs decision, when Judge Clarence Thomas suggested that other substantive opinions on due process – such as same-sex marriage or the right to contraception – could be reconsidered.

Last month, a bipartisan group of senators added a religious freedom amendment to the bill stating that nonprofit religious organizations would not have to provide goods or services for the solemnization of a marriage and that their position on marriage would not affect any federal benefits or tax exemptions.

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