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Fox attack in Effingham, New Hampshire: 1 injured, fox killed

Two fox attacks, nearly 100 miles apart, occurred in New Hampshire on Tuesday. One of the attacks took place in Hollis, where a rabid fox attacked a 4-year-old girl, while another attacked a couple in Carroll County. Elliot Edwards and Erin Francois were working in the yard of their workshop Tuesday morning, when suddenly, out of nowhere, a fox attacked. “There was absolutely nothing we could have done to stop it. It was already happening,” Francois said. >> Download the free WMUR app to get updates on the go: Apple | Google game

Two fox attacks spaced nearly 100 miles apart took place Tuesday in New Hampshire.

One of the attacks took place in Hollis, where a rabid fox attacked a 4-year-old girl, while another attacked a couple in Carroll County.

Elliot Edwards and Erin Francois were working in the yard of their workshop Tuesday morning, when suddenly, out of nowhere, a fox attacked.

“There was absolutely nothing we could have done to stop this. This was already happening,” Francis said.

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Francis said it all happened in less than a minute.

They were attaching a trailer to their truck in the wide-open yard of their workshop, and the next moment a fox was clinging to Edwards’ arm. They managed to get the fox down, but it charged them again.

“We have about 80 acres. You know, we have deer. There are bear prints. We see, you know, a lot of wildlife. Certainly never anything aggressive,” Francois said.

After killing the fox, Francois, who was a nurse for 20 years, cleaned Edwards’ wound with soap, water and alcohol, then immediately took him to the hospital.

There, Edwards received six rabies vaccinations and he also requires three follow-up booster shots. New Hampshire Fish and Game officials said that’s exactly what someone should do if they encounter a wild animal that may have rabies.

“Really, time is of the essence,” said Capt. Michael Eastman of New Hampshire Fish and Game.

Rabies is usually fatal and there is no cure once symptoms appear.

Eastman said animals with rabies this time of year usually contract it while in their dens during the winter, and it takes until now to show symptoms.

Edwards still feels pretty bad, but he’ll be fine. François was not physically injured.

Francois said the game warden took the fox for testing in Concord, and she said they told her the fox tested positive for rabies.

Francois said she spotted two other foxes on her property and she and Edwards were keeping an eye on them.

News Source : www.wmur.com
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