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Florida’s ‘Move Over’ Law Updated

Florida’s ‘Move Over’ Law Will Be Expanded in the New Year

A Florida law that requires drivers to use a lane for stopped emergency vehicles is being updated. Currently, under the state’s “Move Over” law, drivers must cross a lane for stopped emergency, sanitation, utility and construction vehicles. If they cannot move, they must slow down to 20 miles per hour less than the posted speed limit. Starting January 1, the law will include disabled vehicles that are stopped and have hazard lights, emergency flares or emergency signals on. Since 2015, there have been nearly 1,700 crashes statewide where a driver was cited for failing to move, according to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. Among these accidents, there were eight deaths and more than 100 serious injuries. “The law is there for everyone’s safety as well as to prevent accidents. If these people are driving and motorists are not able to stop or reduce their speed, then these accidents can occur, or accidents secondary,” said Trooper Migdalisis Garcia of the Florida Highway Patrol. Violating the law can result in a fine of between $60 and $158. Headline: Florida family locked doors and took turns sleeping before 23-year-old stabbed mother to death See a list of new Florida laws that take effect January 1 2024 Deputies: Man arrested after murder of 17-year-old girlfriend Marion County

A Florida law that requires drivers to use a lane for stopped emergency vehicles is being updated.

Currently, under the state’s “Move Over” law, drivers must move into one lane for stopped emergency, sanitation, utility and construction vehicles.

If they cannot move, they must slow down to 20 miles per hour less than the posted speed limit.

Starting Jan. 1, the law will include disabled vehicles that are stopped and have their hazard lights, flares or emergency signals on.

Since 2015, there have been nearly 1,700 crashes statewide in which a driver was cited for failing to move, according to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.

Among these accidents, there were eight deaths and more than 100 serious injuries.

“The law is there for everyone’s safety as well as to prevent accidents. If these people are driving and motorists are not able to stop or reduce their speed, then these accidents can occur, or accidents secondary,” Trooper said. Migdalisis Garcia of the Florida Highway Patrol said.

Violating the law can result in a fine ranging from $60 to $158.

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