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Experienced climber Roscoe ‘Rocky’ Shorey found dead after falling 1,200 ft. Mount St. Helens volcano crater

The body of an experienced climber, who had successfully ventured nearly 30 times up Mount St. Helens, has been found inside its volcano after he reportedly fell to his death.

Roscoe “Rocky” Shorey, 42, was found around 7 a.m. Saturday — 1,200 feet below the summit of the Washington state mountain — when a climbing group explored the area, it was announced Monday. the Skamania County Sheriff’s Office in a statement.

The body of climber Roscoe “Rocky” Shorey was discovered Saturday in the crater of the Mount St. Helens volcano. Rocky Shorey / Instagram

The discovery came after the group reached the summit of Mount St. Helens, near the Monitor Ridge climbing route, and found Shorey’s belongings near the crater rim.

The group members then found a “motionless person in the crater of the volcano” and quickly contacted authorities.

Police said Shorey’s belongings were found near a fractured snow cornice – an overhanging edge of snow on a ridge – and believed he had fallen into the volcano while the climber was standing on it.

Rescuers from the Skamania County Sheriff’s Office and a rescue team from Yacolt, Wash., were flown to the volcano, then descended on foot to recover Shorey’s body.

Shorey’s body was airlifted to the command center at Marble Mountain Sno-Park — about five miles away — where authorities were able to identify the avid mountaineer.

The Hawaii native had successfully climbed Mount St. Helens 28 times before the tragic accident and was called an “experienced mountaineer.”

Police believe Shorey fell while standing on a snowy ledge. Rocky Shorey / Instagram
Rescuers from the Skamania County Sheriff’s Office and a rescue team from Yacolt, Wash., were flown to the volcano, then descended on foot to recover Shorey’s body. Skamania County Sheriff’s Office

Bret Barnum, a longtime friend of Shorey’s, spoke with KGW Monday after news of his death broke.

“This is an extremely difficult time. Rocky was more my little brother than my friend,” his friend of more than two decades told the outlet.

“In 42 years, this guy lived a hundred years of life easily… I was lucky enough to be able to get in the car and take a ride with him. Any time we could get out was an adventure.

“The testimony of his life is that he just lived it. He lived in his own way. He didn’t live dangerously. He lived it with prediction, with passion, with intention,” said Barnum, who said Shorey was more like a “little brother” to him than a friend.

Members of the group found a “motionless person in the volcano’s crater” and quickly contacted authorities. Rocky Shorey / Instagram
Shorey’s body was airlifted to the command center at Marble Mountain Sno-Park — about five miles away — where authorities were able to identify the avid mountaineer. Rocky Shorey / Instagram

Before his death, Shorey lived in Washougal, Washington – about 20 miles from Portland, Oregon – and worked as a Mountain House brand ambassador.

The company, which sells meals to survivors and explorers, called him “an intrepid adventurer with an appetite for the outdoors almost as big as his cheerful heart” in a statement.

“We will remember him for his boundless energy, his optimistic attitude and his true Aloha spirit… He was a true friend and will be missed by all.” »

The Hawaii native had successfully climbed Mount St Helens 28 times before the tragic accident and was described as an “experienced mountaineer”. Rocky Shorey / Instagram

The volcano, which last erupted on May 18, 1980, is a hot spot for beginners and experienced climbers, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The crater rim is 8,365 feet above sea level and it typically takes the average climber seven to twelve hours to complete a round trip.

Although climbers are allowed on the crater rim, “entry into the crater is strictly prohibited,” according to the U.S. Forest Service.

In 2010, a climber from Kelso, Washington, also died after the cornice beneath him gave way while he was on the edge of Mount St. Helens.

New York Post

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