Jannah Theme License is not validated, Go to the theme options page to validate the license, You need a single license for each domain name.
USA

Biden and Trump presidential debates; time spent outdoors and myopia: NPR

Good morning. You are reading the Up First newsletter. Subscribe here to receive it in your inbox, and listen to the Up First podcast for all the news you need to start your day.

Today’s best stories

President Biden and former President Donald Trump have agreed to hold two presidential debates. CNN is scheduled to host the first broadcast on June 27, well before early voting begins. ABC is scheduled to host the second on September 10. Both debates bypass the fall schedule and traditional format proposed by the Commission on Presidential Debates.

In this 2020 file photo, President Biden and then-President Donald Trump participate in the second and final presidential debate of this election.

Morry Gash/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Morry Gash/AP


In this 2020 file photo, President Biden and then-President Donald Trump participate in the second and final presidential debate of this election.

Morry Gash/AP

  • “For a long time, there was a lot of questioning whether the two would actually face each other.” NPR’s Franco Ordoñez reports First. These debates will take place before either man becomes his party’s official candidate. Ordoñez says Trump and Biden pushed for an earlier date because both candidates “want to separate themselves, to sort of distinguish who they are.”

The United Nations has revised downwards the number of women and children killed over the past seven months in Gaza. The revision, which now only cites the number of women and children killed based on those who have been fully identified by the Gaza Health Ministry, has caused some confusion in media reporting. Israel’s foreign minister shared one of them, saying the UN had cut that figure in half. UN spokesperson Farhan Haq clarified that the Health Ministry’s toll, reporting more than 35,000 people killed in the ongoing Israeli military offensive in Gaza, remains reliable. The death toll estimate covers the seven months since the October 7 attacks by Hamas that killed 1,200 people in Israel. Here’s a closer look at the backlash.

Also this week, the Biden administration announced it would conduct a billion-dollar arms transfer to Israel. NPR’s Mara Liasson reports that the White House has “tried to show the nuances of this issue,” which has caused deep divisions within her party. Biden said last week that he would not give Israel any bombs that could be used in Rafah, but made the distinction that other military aid would continue.

Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico is in stable but serious condition after being shot multiple times on Wednesday, according to local authorities. Police have taken one suspect into custody and say the assassination attempt was politically motivated.

  • The attack was widely condemned across Europe, NPR’s Rob Schmitz reports from Berlin. Slovak Defense Minister Robert Kalinak denounced the political environment that led to the attack. But some political observers say Fico’s government created this environment. Fico has been plagued by corruption scandals and has pushed for state control of the free press.

Image exhibition

Bertha and Wilson Twitchell in front of their home in Kasigluk, Alaska. Wilson grew up here. He drew a picture of what the land looked like when he was young: grass and dry land surrounded the house, extending at least 80 feet to the riverbank, where he remembers playing with toy boats. Today, when the water is particularly high, the house almost looks like an island.

https://www.npr.org/2024/04/03/1242451927/permafrost-underlying-many-remote-villages-in-alaska-is-thawing-and-thats-a-prob


hide caption

toggle caption

https://www.npr.org/2024/04/03/1242451927/permafrost-underlying-many-remote-villages-in-alaska-is-thawing-and-thats-a-prob


Bertha and Wilson Twitchell in front of their home in Kasigluk, Alaska. Wilson grew up here. He drew a picture of what the land looked like when he was young: grass and dry land surrounded the house, extending at least 80 feet to the riverbank, where he remembers playing with toy boats. Today, when the water is particularly high, the house almost looks like an island.

https://www.npr.org/2024/04/03/1242451927/permafrost-underlying-many-remote-villages-in-alaska-is-thawing-and-thats-a-prob

Wilson Twitchell and his wife are raising seven children in a small house in Kasigluk, a Yup’ik village of about 450 people in southwest Alaska. They love their village, but they don’t know how much longer their house will stand. The permafrost beneath their village, once frozen year-round, began to thaw. The Twitchells, like families in Alaska Native communities across the state, are in a race against time to move. And we don’t know where they will go.

See photos showing how climate change is affecting this Alaska community and find out what can be done.

Deep dive

Mixed race child enjoying the outdoors and authentic connection with nature in Auckland, New Zealand.

nazar_ab/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

nazar_ab/Getty Images


Mixed race child enjoying the outdoors and authentic connection with nature in Auckland, New Zealand.

nazar_ab/Getty Images

Spending time outside isn’t just good for getting some fresh air. It can also improve children’s eyesight. Pediatric ophthalmologist Noha Ekdawi says it is one of the best forms of myopia prevention, which is growing rapidly in the United States and around the world.

  • Myopia, or nearsightedness, occurs when the eyeball stretches and elongates too long, which makes distant objects blurry.
  • Once a child becomes nearsighted, the eye continues to lengthen. If it progresses to high myopia, it could increase the risks of retinal detachments, glaucoma and cataracts.
  • Light stimulates the eye to release the neurotransmitter dopamine, which can slow the stretching of the eyeball.
  • Research suggests children should spend at least two hours a day outdoors – each day.

3 things to know before you leave

Killer whales are photographed during a storm in the Skjervoy Fjord in 2021 off the coast of northern Norway. Researchers say orcas are intensifying their “attacks” on yachts along Europe’s Iberian coast.

Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images


Killer whales are photographed during a storm in the Skjervoy Fjord in 2021 off the coast of northern Norway. Researchers say orcas are intensifying their “attacks” on yachts along Europe’s Iberian coast.

Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images

  1. A group of orcas sank a yacht off the coast from Spain on Sunday. It’s the latest in a series of orca “attacks” that have left scientists perplexed.
  2. A bipartisan group of senators, led by Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, have released a much-anticipated report detailing steps Congress can take to address the risks of artificial intelligence.
  3. Jared Isaacman, a private astronaut, wants to take a maintenance team in a SpaceX capsule to help improve the Hubble Space Telescope. After exploring options, internal NASA emails obtained by NPR through a Freedom of Information Act request show the organization was concerned about the risk.

This newsletter was published by Majd Al-Waheidi.

NPR News

Back to top button