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Alexei Navalny’s exiled ally vows to “never give up” his fight against Putin so that the late Russian opposition leader’s sacrifice is “not in vain”

An exiled ally of Alexei Navalny has vowed to “never give up” his fight against Vladimir Putin to ensure the late Russian opposition leader’s sacrifice is “not in vain”.

Leonid Volkov, speaking after a horrific hammer and tear gas attack outside his Lithuanian home in March, described his friend’s death as an “open wound in our hearts”.

Navalny died aged 47 in an Arctic prison camp in February.

Volkov insisted there was “no magic trick” to topple Putin, but called on Ukraine’s Western allies to send more weapons to the front line and not consider to negotiate with the Russian leader.

He told the BBC: “If there are 50 things we can do we have to do all 50, if you do 49 it’s not enough because that’s the biggest threat to the world we have seen in 80 years. ‘

Leonid Volkov, Alexei Navalny's top aide, speaking in March.  Navalny's exiled ally pledged to

Leonid Volkov, Alexei Navalny’s top aide, speaking in March. Navalny’s exiled ally has vowed to “never give up” his fight against Vladimir Putin to ensure the late Russian opposition leader’s sacrifice is “not in vain”.

Volkov pictured speaking to the BBC yesterday

Volkov pictured speaking to the BBC yesterday

Navalny pictured at a rally in St. Petersburg in 2012. He died aged 47 in an Arctic prison camp in February

Navalny pictured at a rally in St. Petersburg in 2012. He died aged 47 in an Arctic prison camp in February

Vladimir Putin pictured yesterday at a press conference in China.  Volkov insisted that there was no

Vladimir Putin pictured yesterday at a press conference in China. Volkov insisted there was “no magic trick” to topple Putin, but called on Ukraine’s Western allies to send more weapons to the front line and not consider to negotiate with the Russian leader.

Navalny’s aide acknowledged that there was “no substitution” for the late politician but that his wife Yulia Navalnaya was seen by “everyone” as the new “charismatic” leader of the opposition movement.

Volkov added that Navalnaya did not want to be seen as the heir to her husband, who many allies say, described as extremists by authorities, was assassinated by Putin.

Regarding the Russian leader, Volkov stressed that he had no borders and was killing people all over the continent, on the front lines and even in Russia.

He added that Putin’s recent shows of force were just a facade and urged Western leaders not to be fooled.

The attack on Volkov’s home in Vilnius, Lithuania, took place on March 12 and saw an attacker smash a window of his car, spray tear gas in his eyes and begin beating him with a hammer, according to the Navalny spokesperson Kira Yarmysh.

Photos of Volkov’s injuries revealed he suffered a black eye, a red mark on his forehead and bleeding on his leg, which had soaked into his jeans.

The opponent claimed that the message behind the attack on his property was that his enemies knew where he was and could harm him if they wanted.

Volkov was a close ally of Navalny, working as the late leader’s former chief of staff and president of his Anti-Corruption Foundation until 2023.

Yulia Navalnaya (photo, in Berlin on election day in March), widow of Alexei Navalny, believes the Kremlin ordered her husband's murder

Yulia Navalnaya (photo, in Berlin on election day in March), widow of Alexei Navalny, believes the Kremlin ordered her husband’s murder

Photos of Volkov's injuries after his home was attacked in March revealed he suffered a black eye and a red mark on his forehead.

Photos of Volkov’s injuries after his home was attacked in March revealed he suffered a black eye and a red mark on his forehead.

Volkov was a close ally of Alexei Navalny (pictured during his 2017 trial in the Moscow city's Tverskoy Court), working as the late leader's ex-chief of staff and president of his Anti-Corruption Foundation until 2023.

Volkov was a close ally of Alexei Navalny (pictured during his 2017 trial in the Moscow city’s Tverskoy Court), working as the late leader’s ex-chief of staff and president of his Anti-Corruption Foundation until 2023.

Navalny had been imprisoned since January 2021, when he returned to Moscow to face certain arrest after recovering in Germany from nerve agent poisoning that he blamed on the Kremlin.

Its Anti-Corruption Foundation and regional offices were designated “extremist organizations” by the Russian government that same year.

Volkov was formerly responsible for regional offices. He left Russia under pressure from the authorities.

Navalny’s death, reported by prison officials on February 16, sent shock waves around the world.

Russian authorities say Navalny died in the Arctic prison of natural causes, but his wife Yulia Navalnaya has accused Putin of having him killed – an accusation the Kremlin vehemently rejects.

Recently, U.S. intelligence confirmed Putin’s claims, determining that the Russian president likely did not order the opposition politician’s assassination, The Wall Street Journal reported last month.

The newspaper said Washington had not absolved the Russian leader of overall responsibility for Navalny’s death, given that the opposition politician had been targeted by Russian authorities for years, imprisoned on charges which the West described as politically motivated and was poisoned in 2020 with cheek. agent.

The Kremlin denies any state involvement in the 2020 poisoning.

The attacker broke a window of Volkov's car (pictured), sprayed tear gas in his eyes and started hitting him with a hammer, Navalny's spokeswoman Kira Yarmysh said.

The attacker broke a window of Volkov’s car (pictured), sprayed tear gas in his eyes and began hitting him with a hammer, Navalny’s spokeswoman Kira Yarmysh said.

Alexei Navalny seen on a screen via video link from the IK-3 penal colony above the Arctic Circle during a hearing into his complaint over restrictions on the books and reading materials he can access in prison, at the Moscow Supreme Court on January 11, 2024

Alexei Navalny seen on a screen via video link from the IK-3 penal colony above the Arctic Circle during a hearing into his complaint over restrictions on the books and reading materials he can access in prison, at the Moscow Supreme Court on January 11, 2024

Opposition leader Alexei Navalny is arrested by Russian police officers during a march to protest against the alleged impunity of law enforcement in central Moscow on June 12, 2019.

Opposition leader Alexei Navalny is arrested by Russian police officers during a march to protest against the alleged impunity of law enforcement in central Moscow on June 12, 2019.

The mothers of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and his widow Yulia Navalnaya, Lyudmila and Alla, stand in front of Navalny's grave on March 2, 2024, the day after his funeral at the Borisovskoye cemetery in Moscow.

The mothers of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and his widow Yulia Navalnaya, Lyudmila and Alla, stand in front of Navalny’s grave on March 2, 2024, the day after his funeral at the Borisovskoye cemetery in Moscow.

Reuters could not independently verify the Journal’s report, which cited sources saying the findings had been “widely accepted within the intelligence community and shared by several agencies, including the Central Intelligence Agency, the Office of Director of National Intelligence and the Department of State. intelligence unit.

The US assessment was based on a range of information, including classified intelligence, and an analysis of public facts, including the timing of Navalny’s death and how it overshadowed Putin’s re-election in March, they said. the newspaper said, citing some of its sources.

He quotes Volkov who calls the American conclusions naive and ridiculous.

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