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A slice of pizza in New York now costs $3.14, surpassing the cost of a subway ride at $2.75 for the first time ever


Last thing we knead! A slice of pizza in New York now costs $3.14 – surpassing the cost of a subway ride at $2.75 for the first time ever as inflation drives up the price of ingredients and labor ‘artwork

  • Prices for a slice of plain pizza now exceed $3.00 in New York
  • Subway fares have been frozen at $2.75 per ride for the foreseeable future
  • With rising inflation affecting ingredient costs, the gap could widen further
  • In 1980, a slice could be purchased for less than 90 cents. It took another ten years for the price to rise by 10 cents, to $1.00, and another ten years to reach $2.00 in 2000.
  • Pizza prices started to rise faster with averages at $2.50 in 2010 before crossing $3.00 in 2022

A slice of New York pizza now costs more than a ride on the city’s subway.

In what is a very New York metric, also known as the “pizza principle”, the average cost of a slice of regular pizza is now $3.14, well above the rate of 2 $.75 for a subway ride.

The price of a slice is over $3 in all five boroughs for the first time.

Brooklyn’s average is $3.06 while the cost is even higher in Manhattan at $3.26.

A medium slice of pizza in the Bronx is $3.15, it’s $3.12 in Staten Island, and slightly cheaper in Queens at $3.10.

The cost of a subway ride and a slice of pizza have gone up in tandem for years, but now a slice of pizza is on average more expensive

A slice of pizza in New York now costs $3.14, surpassing the cost of a subway ride at $2.75 for the first time ever

In 1980, a slice could be purchased for less than 90 cents. It took another ten years for the price to rise 10 cents to $1.00 and another ten years to $2.00 in 2000

A slice of pizza in New York now costs $3.14, surpassing the cost of a subway ride at $2.75 for the first time ever

Prices for a slice of plain pizza now exceed $3.00 in New York

New York Governor Kathy Hochul said the subway fare will remain frozen for the foreseeable future, meaning inflation is driving up the cost of pizza ingredients, the gap between the price of a slice and the subway ride could get even steeper.

“I’ve always talked about it. And now there is a discrepancy,” Paul Giannone, owner of Paulie Gee’s Slice Shop in Brooklyn, told Bloomberg.

I’ve been talking about it forever. And now there is a discrepancy.

In 1980, a slice could be purchased for less than 90 cents. It took another ten years for the price to rise 10 cents to $1.00 and another ten years to $2.00 in 2000. But in 2010 prices started to rise faster with averages at 2.50 $ in 2010 before exceeding $3.00 in 2022.

A slice of pizza in New York now costs $3.14, surpassing the cost of a subway ride at $2.75 for the first time ever

Brooklyn’s average is $3.06 while the cost is even higher in Manhattan at $3.26. A medium slice of pizza in the Bronx costs $3.15, $3.12 in Staten Island and a little less in Queens at $3.10

A slice of pizza in New York now costs $3.14, surpassing the cost of a subway ride at $2.75 for the first time ever

Subway fares have been frozen at $2.75 per ride for the foreseeable future

But it’s not just inflation that’s driving up the cost of ingredients, but also the cost of gas to light the ovens and the cost of labor.

The average price of gas rose 24% for urban consumers nationwide, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Although the cost of cheese prices has not increased as much as some other food products during the pandemic, it has still increased by about 10% over three years.

Flour rose 11.6% in the last year alone – the fastest increase in more than a decade.

Wages in the food industry also rose about 7.9% year-over-year, according to the New York State Department of Labor.

Although some places still offer 99-cent slices in Manhattan, some pizzerias have also managed to keep their slices at $2.75.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in 2015 increased the base fare for city subways and buses from $2.50 to $2.75, where it remains today.

The MTA tends to raise fares every two years and was supposed to raise those fees in 2021, but its board postponed the hike to ease the cost to passengers during the pandemic.

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